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John Angle

John Angle 3/29/2020

2008 Chrysler PT Cruiser Limited 4 Cyl 2.40L

Engine

Where does the ignition coil driver get its ground

Have replaced all sensors including PCM everything receiving power except ignition coil driver is liking ground

5 Answers


Jimm

Jimm 3/29/2020

You can use a multimeter or a test light to test the power (12 Volt) circuit of the coil pack.

The wire that feeds 12 Volts to the ignition coil is the wire labeled with the number 2 (middle wire)

These are the test steps:

1) Disconnect the ignition coil connected from its connector.

2) Put the multimeter in Volts DC mode.

3) Probe the circuit labeled with the number 2 with the red multimeter test lead (using an appropriate tool to pierce the wire).

NOTE: The three wires in the ignition coil pack's connector are usually sheathed in black electrical tape that has probably turned plastic hard, remove enough of this electrical tape to expose the three wires for testing.

4) Connect the black multimeter test lead to the battery negative (-) terminal.

5) Have your helper turn the key to the ON position and THEN CRANK THE CAR OR MINI-VAN.

6) You should see 10-12 Volts on your multimeter, or if you're using a test light, the test light should light up.

If the multimeter DID NOT register 10 to 12 Volts DC. Re-check all of your connections and retest. If still no voltage is present, this result exonerates the coil pack since without it the ignition coil will not function.

Repairing the cause of this missing voltage will solve the 'no spark - no start' condition of your car.

The most common cause of this missing voltage (12 V) is that the crankshaft position sensor has gone bad.

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0
Jimm

Jimm 3/29/2020

You can use a multimeter or a test light to test the power (12 Volt) circuit of the coil pack.

The wire that feeds 12 Volts to the ignition coil is the wire labeled with the number 2 (middle wire)

These are the test steps:

1) Disconnect the ignition coil connected from its connector.

2) Put the multimeter in Volts DC mode.

3) Probe the circuit labeled with the number 2 with the red multimeter test lead (using an appropriate tool to pierce the wire).

NOTE: The three wires in the ignition coil pack's connector are usually sheathed in black electrical tape that has probably turned plastic hard, remove enough of this electrical tape to expose the three wires for testing.

4) Connect the black multimeter test lead to the battery negative (-) terminal.

5) Have your helper turn the key to the ON position and THEN CRANK THE CAR OR MINI-VAN.

6) You should see 10-12 Volts on your multimeter, or if you're using a test light, the test light should light up.

If the multimeter DID NOT register 10 to 12 Volts DC. Re-check all of your connections and retest. If still no voltage is present, this result exonerates the coil pack since without it the ignition coil will not function.

Repairing the cause of this missing voltage will solve the 'no spark - no start' condition of your car.

The most common cause of this missing voltage (12 V) is that the crankshaft position sensor has gone bad.

Reply
0
Jimm

Jimm 3/29/2020

You can use a multimeter or a test light to test the power (12 Volt) circuit of the coil pack.

The wire that feeds 12 Volts to the ignition coil is the wire labeled with the number 2 (middle wire)

These are the test steps:

1) Disconnect the ignition coil connected from its connector.

2) Put the multimeter in Volts DC mode.

3) Probe the circuit labeled with the number 2 with the red multimeter test lead (using an appropriate tool to pierce the wire).

NOTE: The three wires in the ignition coil pack's connector are usually sheathed in black electrical tape that has probably turned plastic hard, remove enough of this electrical tape to expose the three wires for testing.

4) Connect the black multimeter test lead to the battery negative (-) terminal.

5) Have your helper turn the key to the ON position and THEN CRANK THE CAR OR MINI-VAN.

6) You should see 10-12 Volts on your multimeter, or if you're using a test light, the test light should light up.

If the multimeter DID NOT register 10 to 12 Volts DC. Re-check all of your connections and retest. If still no voltage is present, this result exonerates the coil pack since without it the ignition coil will not function.

Repairing the cause of this missing voltage will solve the 'no spark - no start' condition of your car.

The most common cause of this missing voltage (12 V) is that the crankshaft position sensor has gone bad.

Reply
0
Jimm

Jimm 3/29/2020

You can use a multimeter or a test light to test the power (12 Volt) circuit of the coil pack.

The wire that feeds 12 Volts to the ignition coil is the wire labeled with the number 2 (middle wire)

These are the test steps:

1) Disconnect the ignition coil connected from its connector.

2) Put the multimeter in Volts DC mode.

3) Probe the circuit labeled with the number 2 with the red multimeter test lead (using an appropriate tool to pierce the wire).

NOTE: The three wires in the ignition coil pack's connector are usually sheathed in black electrical tape that has probably turned plastic hard, remove enough of this electrical tape to expose the three wires for testing.

4) Connect the black multimeter test lead to the battery negative (-) terminal.

5) Have your helper turn the key to the ON position and THEN CRANK THE CAR OR MINI-VAN.

6) You should see 10-12 Volts on your multimeter, or if you're using a test light, the test light should light up.

If the multimeter DID NOT register 10 to 12 Volts DC. Re-check all of your connections and retest. If still no voltage is present, this result exonerates the coil pack since without it the ignition coil will not function.

Repairing the cause of this missing voltage will solve the 'no spark - no start' condition of your car.

The most common cause of this missing voltage (12 V) is that the crankshaft position sensor has gone bad.

Reply
0
Jimm

Jimm 3/29/2020

You can use a multimeter or a test light to test the power (12 Volt) circuit of the coil pack.

The wire that feeds 12 Volts to the ignition coil is the wire labeled with the number 2 (middle wire)

These are the test steps:

1) Disconnect the ignition coil connected from its connector.

2) Put the multimeter in Volts DC mode.

3) Probe the circuit labeled with the number 2 with the red multimeter test lead (using an appropriate tool to pierce the wire).

NOTE: The three wires in the ignition coil pack's connector are usually sheathed in black electrical tape that has probably turned plastic hard, remove enough of this electrical tape to expose the three wires for testing.

4) Connect the black multimeter test lead to the battery negative (-) terminal.

5) Have your helper turn the key to the ON position and THEN CRANK THE CAR OR MINI-VAN.

6) You should see 10-12 Volts on your multimeter, or if you're using a test light, the test light should light up.

If the multimeter DID NOT register 10 to 12 Volts DC. Re-check all of your connections and retest. If still no voltage is present, this result exonerates the coil pack since without it the ignition coil will not function.

Repairing the cause of this missing voltage will solve the 'no spark - no start' condition of your car.

The most common cause of this missing voltage (12 V) is that the crankshaft position sensor has gone bad.

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