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Gabriella

Gabriella 1/12/2020

2014 Suzuki Swift GLX 4 Cyl 1.40L

Engine

My car traction control light is on and sometimes when I brake, the car hesitates and shakes and vibrates before going.

When I come to a stop at traffic lights, some of the time when I press the accelerator the car will start to vibrate and shake and hesitates for a few seconds (between 5-15) before actually accelerating. The traction control light has also been on for about 6 months, although I'm unsure if it's related. My car has also started either not starting, or it will start and occasionally just die when driving; although once turning it off and back on it usually is right. It's been to 4 different mechanics and nobody is sure what the issue is. Has anyone experienced this or knows what could be causing It?

6 Answers


Jimm

Jimm 1/15/2020

Several possibilities; corrosion in the plugs of the ABS sensors (front or rear), faulty / dirty ABS sensors, low brake fluid level in the brake master cylinder.

There are three main things that would cause your issues.
1. Restricted brake line where the fluid can be forced out to the caliper when the pedal is pressed but can't release because the restriction is stopping the return of the fluid, there's no force applied after you release the pedal.

2. Another is a stuck piston. The piston moving toward the rotor is the action caused by the fluid when the brakes are applied, but if its tight or dragging in the bore you have the same scenario as when a line is restricted. The piston can't move back so the brakes remain applied.


3. Last is lack of lubrication on the slide rails or pins that the calipers slide on. These have to be lubed regularly or they'll rust and cause the calipers to stick in the braking position. Any one of these can result in overheating of the rotors, pads, calipers and fluid. If the fluid boils you get the pedal to the floor syndrome.

The way to check if a brake line on the front is bad:
• Secure back wheels with blocks, then Jack up the front of the vehicle on the problem side (left or right) and take off the tire.
• With the engine off, put the car in neutral (this is so the wheel can free spin) and pump the brakes real hard about 20 times to build up pressure in the system.
• Then get out of vehicle and see if caliper is sticking by trying to turn the disk.
• If it is sticking, get a wrench and open the bleeder screw on that caliper one turn. Then see if the wheel turns while the bleeder screw is open. If it does, then the brake hose is bad (collapsed) internally.
• If the wheel still doesn't spin, then the caliper is bad. This could mean that your caliper slider screws are rusty and gunked up, or the piston (s) in the caliper are frozen and would need to be rebuilt (pulled out and put in new seals) then re-seat piston(s) in caliper.

Reply
0
Jimm

Jimm 1/15/2020

Several possibilities; corrosion in the plugs of the ABS sensors (front or rear), faulty / dirty ABS sensors, low brake fluid level in the brake master cylinder.

There are three main things that would cause your issues.
1. Restricted brake line where the fluid can be forced out to the caliper when the pedal is pressed but can't release because the restriction is stopping the return of the fluid, there's no force applied after you release the pedal.

2. Another is a stuck piston. The piston moving toward the rotor is the action caused by the fluid when the brakes are applied, but if its tight or dragging in the bore you have the same scenario as when a line is restricted. The piston can't move back so the brakes remain applied.


3. Last is lack of lubrication on the slide rails or pins that the calipers slide on. These have to be lubed regularly or they'll rust and cause the calipers to stick in the braking position. Any one of these can result in overheating of the rotors, pads, calipers and fluid. If the fluid boils you get the pedal to the floor syndrome.

The way to check if a brake line on the front is bad:
• Secure back wheels with blocks, then Jack up the front of the vehicle on the problem side (left or right) and take off the tire.
• With the engine off, put the car in neutral (this is so the wheel can free spin) and pump the brakes real hard about 20 times to build up pressure in the system.
• Then get out of vehicle and see if caliper is sticking by trying to turn the disk.
• If it is sticking, get a wrench and open the bleeder screw on that caliper one turn. Then see if the wheel turns while the bleeder screw is open. If it does, then the brake hose is bad (collapsed) internally.
• If the wheel still doesn't spin, then the caliper is bad. This could mean that your caliper slider screws are rusty and gunked up, or the piston (s) in the caliper are frozen and would need to be rebuilt (pulled out and put in new seals) then re-seat piston(s) in caliper.

Reply
0
Jimm

Jimm 1/15/2020

Several possibilities; corrosion in the plugs of the ABS sensors (front or rear), faulty / dirty ABS sensors, low brake fluid level in the brake master cylinder.

There are three main things that would cause your issues.
1. Restricted brake line where the fluid can be forced out to the caliper when the pedal is pressed but can't release because the restriction is stopping the return of the fluid, there's no force applied after you release the pedal.

2. Another is a stuck piston. The piston moving toward the rotor is the action caused by the fluid when the brakes are applied, but if its tight or dragging in the bore you have the same scenario as when a line is restricted. The piston can't move back so the brakes remain applied.


3. Last is lack of lubrication on the slide rails or pins that the calipers slide on. These have to be lubed regularly or they'll rust and cause the calipers to stick in the braking position. Any one of these can result in overheating of the rotors, pads, calipers and fluid. If the fluid boils you get the pedal to the floor syndrome.

The way to check if a brake line on the front is bad:
• Secure back wheels with blocks, then Jack up the front of the vehicle on the problem side (left or right) and take off the tire.
• With the engine off, put the car in neutral (this is so the wheel can free spin) and pump the brakes real hard about 20 times to build up pressure in the system.
• Then get out of vehicle and see if caliper is sticking by trying to turn the disk.
• If it is sticking, get a wrench and open the bleeder screw on that caliper one turn. Then see if the wheel turns while the bleeder screw is open. If it does, then the brake hose is bad (collapsed) internally.
• If the wheel still doesn't spin, then the caliper is bad. This could mean that your caliper slider screws are rusty and gunked up, or the piston (s) in the caliper are frozen and would need to be rebuilt (pulled out and put in new seals) then re-seat piston(s) in caliper.

Reply
0
Jimm

Jimm 1/15/2020

Several possibilities; corrosion in the plugs of the ABS sensors (front or rear), faulty / dirty ABS sensors, low brake fluid level in the brake master cylinder.

There are three main things that would cause your issues.
1. Restricted brake line where the fluid can be forced out to the caliper when the pedal is pressed but can't release because the restriction is stopping the return of the fluid, there's no force applied after you release the pedal.

2. Another is a stuck piston. The piston moving toward the rotor is the action caused by the fluid when the brakes are applied, but if its tight or dragging in the bore you have the same scenario as when a line is restricted. The piston can't move back so the brakes remain applied.


3. Last is lack of lubrication on the slide rails or pins that the calipers slide on. These have to be lubed regularly or they'll rust and cause the calipers to stick in the braking position. Any one of these can result in overheating of the rotors, pads, calipers and fluid. If the fluid boils you get the pedal to the floor syndrome.

The way to check if a brake line on the front is bad:
• Secure back wheels with blocks, then Jack up the front of the vehicle on the problem side (left or right) and take off the tire.
• With the engine off, put the car in neutral (this is so the wheel can free spin) and pump the brakes real hard about 20 times to build up pressure in the system.
• Then get out of vehicle and see if caliper is sticking by trying to turn the disk.
• If it is sticking, get a wrench and open the bleeder screw on that caliper one turn. Then see if the wheel turns while the bleeder screw is open. If it does, then the brake hose is bad (collapsed) internally.
• If the wheel still doesn't spin, then the caliper is bad. This could mean that your caliper slider screws are rusty and gunked up, or the piston (s) in the caliper are frozen and would need to be rebuilt (pulled out and put in new seals) then re-seat piston(s) in caliper.

Reply
0
Jimm

Jimm 1/15/2020

Several possibilities; corrosion in the plugs of the ABS sensors (front or rear), faulty / dirty ABS sensors, low brake fluid level in the brake master cylinder.

There are three main things that would cause your issues.
1. Restricted brake line where the fluid can be forced out to the caliper when the pedal is pressed but can't release because the restriction is stopping the return of the fluid, there's no force applied after you release the pedal.

2. Another is a stuck piston. The piston moving toward the rotor is the action caused by the fluid when the brakes are applied, but if its tight or dragging in the bore you have the same scenario as when a line is restricted. The piston can't move back so the brakes remain applied.


3. Last is lack of lubrication on the slide rails or pins that the calipers slide on. These have to be lubed regularly or they'll rust and cause the calipers to stick in the braking position. Any one of these can result in overheating of the rotors, pads, calipers and fluid. If the fluid boils you get the pedal to the floor syndrome.

The way to check if a brake line on the front is bad:
• Secure back wheels with blocks, then Jack up the front of the vehicle on the problem side (left or right) and take off the tire.
• With the engine off, put the car in neutral (this is so the wheel can free spin) and pump the brakes real hard about 20 times to build up pressure in the system.
• Then get out of vehicle and see if caliper is sticking by trying to turn the disk.
• If it is sticking, get a wrench and open the bleeder screw on that caliper one turn. Then see if the wheel turns while the bleeder screw is open. If it does, then the brake hose is bad (collapsed) internally.
• If the wheel still doesn't spin, then the caliper is bad. This could mean that your caliper slider screws are rusty and gunked up, or the piston (s) in the caliper are frozen and would need to be rebuilt (pulled out and put in new seals) then re-seat piston(s) in caliper.

Reply
0
Jimm

Jimm 1/15/2020

Several possibilities; corrosion in the plugs of the ABS sensors (front or rear), faulty / dirty ABS sensors, low brake fluid level in the brake master cylinder.

There are three main things that would cause your issues.
1. Restricted brake line where the fluid can be forced out to the caliper when the pedal is pressed but can't release because the restriction is stopping the return of the fluid, there's no force applied after you release the pedal.

2. Another is a stuck piston. The piston moving toward the rotor is the action caused by the fluid when the brakes are applied, but if its tight or dragging in the bore you have the same scenario as when a line is restricted. The piston can't move back so the brakes remain applied.


3. Last is lack of lubrication on the slide rails or pins that the calipers slide on. These have to be lubed regularly or they'll rust and cause the calipers to stick in the braking position. Any one of these can result in overheating of the rotors, pads, calipers and fluid. If the fluid boils you get the pedal to the floor syndrome.

The way to check if a brake line on the front is bad:
• Secure back wheels with blocks, then Jack up the front of the vehicle on the problem side (left or right) and take off the tire.
• With the engine off, put the car in neutral (this is so the wheel can free spin) and pump the brakes real hard about 20 times to build up pressure in the system.
• Then get out of vehicle and see if caliper is sticking by trying to turn the disk.
• If it is sticking, get a wrench and open the bleeder screw on that caliper one turn. Then see if the wheel turns while the bleeder screw is open. If it does, then the brake hose is bad (collapsed) internally.
• If the wheel still doesn't spin, then the caliper is bad. This could mean that your caliper slider screws are rusty and gunked up, or the piston (s) in the caliper are frozen and would need to be rebuilt (pulled out and put in new seals) then re-seat piston(s) in caliper.

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