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D
D 1/21/2011
1995 BMW 318is Base 4Cyl1.8L - Engine
over heating fan wont come on no heat in car
7 Answers
  • J and K AUTOMOTIVE TOWING AND REPAIR
    CAUSES OF OVERHEATING

    Overheating can be caused by anything that decreases the cooling system's ability to absorb, transport and dissipate heat: A low coolant level, a coolant leak (through internal or external leaks), poor heat conductivity inside the engine because of accumulated deposits in the water jackets, a defective thermostat that doesn't open, poor airflow through the radiator, a slipping fan clutch, an inoperative electric cooling fan, a collapsed lower radiator hose, an eroded or loose water pump impeller, or even a defective radiator cap.

    One of nature's basic laws says that heat always flows from an area of higher temperature to an area of lesser temperature, never the other way around. The only way to cool hot metal, therefore, is to keep it in constant contact with a cooler liquid. And the only way to do that is to keep the coolant in constant circulation. As soon as the circulation stops, either because of a problem with the water pump, thermostat or loss of coolant, temperatures begin to rise and the engine starts to overheat.

    The coolant also has to get rid of the heat it soaks up while passing through the block and head(s). So the radiator must be capable of doing its job, which requires the help of an efficient cooling fan at slow speeds.

    The thermostat must be doing its job to keep the engine's average temperature within the normal range so the engine does not overheat. If the thermostat fails to open, it will effectively block the flow of coolant and the engine will overheat.

    Your engine may not be overheating at all. Your temperature gauge or warning lamp may be coming on because of a faulty coolant sensor. Sometimes this can be caused by a low coolant level or air trapped under the sensor.
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  • J and K AUTOMOTIVE TOWING AND REPAIR
    Cooling system leaks -- Loss of coolant because of a coolant leak is probably the most common cause of engine overheating. Possible leak points include hoses, the radiator, heater core, water pump, thermostat housing, head gasket, freeze plugs, automatic transmission oil cooler, cylinder head(s) and block.

    Make a careful visual inspection of the entire cooling system, and then PRESSURE TEST the cooling system and radiator cap. A pressure test will reveal internal leaks such as seepage past the head gasket as well as cracks in the head or block. A good system should hold 12 to 15 psi for 15 minutes or more with no loss in pressure. If it leaks pressure, there is an internal coolant leak (most likely a bad head gasket but possibly also a cracked cylinder or engine block).

    It is important to pressure test the radiator cap, too, because a weak cap (or one with too low a pressure rating for the application) will lower the coolant's boiling point and can allow coolant to escape from the radiator.
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  • J and K AUTOMOTIVE TOWING AND REPAIR
    Leaky Head Gasket -- Bad news because repairs are expensive. A leaky head gasket can allow coolant to seep into the engine's cylinders or crankcase. Symptoms include a loss of coolant with no visible external leaks, and white steam in the exhaust, especially after restarting the engine when it has sit for awhile. A leaky head gasket can be diagnosed by pressure testing the cooling system, or by using a "block checker" that pulls air from the cooling system into a cylinder that contains a special blue colored leak detection liquid. If there are any combustion gases in the coolant, the color of the liquid inside the detector will change from blue to green. A leaky head gasket can often be temporarily sealed by adding a sealer product to the cooling system. But for bad leaks or ones that cannot be stopped with sealer, the head gasket has to be replaced
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  • J and K AUTOMOTIVE TOWING AND REPAIR
    Fan Not Working -- With mechanical fans, most engine overheating problems are caused by a faulty fan clutch, though a missing fan shroud can reduce the fan's cooling effectiveness by as much as 50% (depending on the fan's distance from the radiator) which may be enough to cause the engine to overheat in hot weather or when working hard.

    Defective fan clutches are a common and often overlooked cause of engine overheating. The shear characteristics of the clutch fluid gradually deteriorates over time, with an average loss in drive efficiency of about 200 rpm per year. Eventually slippage reaches the point where effective cooling is no longer possible and overheating results. (On average, the life of a fan clutch is about the same as a water pump. If one needs to be replaced, the other usually does too.)

    If the fan clutch shows signs of fluid leakage (oily streaks radiating outward from the hub of the clutch), spins freely with little or no resistance when the engine is off, or wobbles when the fan is pushed in or out, it needs to be replaced.

    With an electric cooling fan, check to see that the fan cycles on when the engine gets hot and when the air conditioner is on. If the fan fails to come on, check the fan motor wiring connections, fan relay and temperature sensor. Try jumping the fan directly to the battery. If it runs, the problem is in the wiring, relay or sensor. If it fails to run, the fan motor is bad and needs to be replaced
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  • J and K AUTOMOTIVE TOWING AND REPAIR
    Lower Radiator Hose Collapsing -- A pinched hose (upper or lower) or a lower radiator hose that is collapsing and blocking the flow of coolant when the engine is running can cause engine overheating. The lower hose usually has a metal reinforcing wire inside that looks like a large spring. It s purpose is to prevent the hose from collapsing when the water pump is pulling water through the hose. If this wire is missing or has failed due to corrosion, the hose may collapse.
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  • J and K AUTOMOTIVE TOWING AND REPAIR
    Excessive exhaust back pressure -- A clogged catalytic converter will restrict the flow of exhaust and cause heat to back up in the engine. Other causes include a crushed exhaust pipe or a collapsed double wall pipe. Check intake vacuum at idle. If intake vacuum reads low and continues to drop, inspect the exhaust system
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  • stuck
    stuck 2/5/2013
    Try new temostat old proably isn't opening enough (sticky)
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